Question: What Did The Treaty Promise?

Who wanted the Treaty of Waitangi?

The British Government decided that Hobson would ask Māori rangatira to sign a treaty with Queen Victoria.

Hobson would act on the Queen’s behalf because she was in England.

A treaty is an agreement or contract between two or more people, groups, or countries..

How many articles are there in the treaty?

The three articles of the Treaty of Waitangi. The chiefs of the Confederation and all the chiefs who have not joined that Confederation give absolutely to the Queen of England for ever the complete government over their land.

What if there was no Treaty of Waitangi?

So: what if there had been no Treaty of Waitangi? … Another easy answer is that with no treaty there would be no argument about whether, in signing the treaty, iwi ceded sovereignty, as the English version says. In the te reo version they didn’t.

Who was the highest ranking British official to sign the treaty?

In which year and month was the Treaty signed? 6th Feb 1840How many chiefs had signed the Treaty by the end of the first day. 43Who was the Catholic Bishop present at the signing of the Treaty? Bishop PompallierWho was the highest ranking British Official to sign the Treaty? Captain Hobson3 more rows

Why is the Treaty of Waitangi important in education?

The Treaty of Waitangi principle calls for schools to understand and honour Treaty principles in all actions and decision making. It is about making our country’s bicultural foundations evident in school policies, organisation, physical spaces, whānau and community engagement, and classroom planning and assessment.

What are the 4 principles of the Treaty of Waitangi?

What is Te Tiriti o Waitangi (Treaty of Waitangi)?give protection, rights and benefits to Māori as British subjects.give Māori full ownership of their lands, forestries, fisheries, taonga (treasures) and possessions.give the Crown exclusive rights to buy Māori land.give sovereignty/governance of New Zealand to Britain.

What impact did the Treaty of Waitangi have?

Why the Treaty is important The Treaty governs the relationship between Māori – the tangata whenua (indigenous people) – and everyone else, and ensures the rights of both Māori and Pakeha (non-Māori) are protected.

How was the Treaty of Waitangi broken?

It has been estimated that by 1909 at least 18 million acres of it was in individual ownership, almost none of it had been settled by Māori. In the 20th Century there was further loss of Māori land to the Crown through private and Government purchases and under the Public Works Act, that sometimes breached the Treaty.

How many treaty settlements have there been?

73 settlementsAs of August 2018, 73 settlements had been passed into law. The total value of all finalised settlements is $2.24 billion. This may seem like a lot of money, but in the next 12 months, the Government will spend $14 billion on national superannuation alone.

Why is Waitangi Day so important?

Waitangi Day (Māori: Te Rā o Waitangi), the national day of New Zealand, marks the anniversary of the initial signing – on 6 February 1840 – of the Treaty of Waitangi, which is regarded as the founding document of the nation. … Ceremonies take place at Waitangi and elsewhere to commemorate the signing of the treaty.

Why is the Treaty important?

Treaties form the basis of most parts of modern international law. They serve to satisfy a fundamental need of States to regulate by consent issues of common concern, and thus to bring stability into their mutual relations.

How many chiefs did not sign the treaty?

Altogether, over 500 chiefs had signed. Hobson sent the British government copies of the Treaty in Māori and English. Hobson did not have the signatures of every Māori leader in the country. While some had refused to sign, others hadn’t even had the chance – the Treaty hadn’t been taken to their region.

What are the 3 principles of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The three “P’s”, as they are often referred to, are the principles of partnership, participation and protection. These underpin the relationship between the Government and Māori under the Treaty of Waitangi. These principles are derived from the underlying tenets of the Treaty.

Who refused the Treaty of Waitangi?

Tāraia NgākutiTāraia Ngākuti, a chief of Ngāti Tamaterā in the Coromandel, was one of many notable chiefs who refused to sign the Treaty of Waitangi. Tāraia was a famous warrior and may have felt that signing would be beneath him.

What were the consequences of the treaty?

The Treaty of Versailles was signed on June 28, 1919, and officially ended the war between Germany and the Allied Powers. The controversial War Guilt clause blamed Germany for World War I and imposed heavy debt payments on Germany.

Who signed the Treaty of Versailles?

GermanyOn June 28, 1919, Germany and the Allied Nations (including Britain, France, Italy and Russia) signed the Treaty of Versailles, formally ending the war. (Versailles is a city in France, 10 miles outside of Paris.)

What the treaty means today?

The Treaty was a contract of respect between the British and Māori. … The Treaty now means there must be respect between Māori and non-Māori. It is important that the laws and rules today consider and respect both Māori and non-Māori ways of living.

What were the British intentions for the Treaty of Waitangi?

They also wanted to trade with Europeans, and believed the new relationship with Britain would stop fighting between tribes. Those who didn’t sign the treaty were concerned they would lose their independence and power, and wanted to settle their own disputes.

What did the Treaty of Waitangi promise?

Te Tiriti o Waitangi) is an important agreement that was signed by representatives of the British Crown and Māori in 1840. … The Treaty aimed to protect the rights of Māori to keep their land, forests, fisheries and treasures while handing over sovereignty to the English.

What happened after the Treaty of Waitangi?

What happened after the Treaty was signed? Shortly after the Treaty was signed, Lieutenant-Governor William Hobson proclaimed British sovereignty over the whole of New Zealand. … Under British law, New Zealand became technically a part of the colony of New South Wales.

Is the Treaty of Waitangi fair?

Colonists believed the Treaty of Waitangi was fair because it offered Māori the rights of British citizens. The signing of the Treaty made it easier for settlers to acquire land. … These Pākehā were often key ‘go-betweens’, connecting settlers and Māori.

Was the Treaty of Waitangi successful?

The Treaty of Waitangi is an agreement made in 1840 between representatives of the British Crown and more than 500 Māori chiefs. It resulted in the declaration of British sovereignty over New Zealand by Lieutenant-Governor William Hobson in May 1840.